Études in vivo des propriétés antituberculeuses

Artemisia afra Jacq.

Cet article recense les publications concernant les études in vivo des propriétés antituberculeuses d’Artemisia afra Jacq.

Études in vivo des propriétés antituberculeuses

Artemisia afra Jacq.

1999

Julie Laplante
On Knowing and Not Knowing “Life” in Molecular Biology and Xhosa Healing : Ontologies in the Preclinical Trial of a South African Indigenous Medicine (Muthi)
Anthropology of Consciousness, Vol. 25, Issue 1, pp. 1–31,

On Knowing and Not Knowing “Life” in Molecular Biology and Xhosa Healing : Ontologies in the Preclinical Trial of a South African Indigenous Medicine (Muthi)

Abstract :

Seemingly distant practices of molecular biology and indigenous Xhosa healing have commonalities that I would like to bring into conversation in this article. The preclinical trial of an indigenous medicine brings them together in a research consortium. In this instance, both sets of experts are meant to collaborate in preparing a wild bush for it to pass the tests of the randomized clinical trial (RCT) and to potentially become a biopharmaceutical to counter the tuberculosis pandemic. I aim to tease out how the two sets of actors and their respective practices converge and diverge in their healing hopes and ways of managing uncertainty. Ultimately, I am interested in understanding how the preferred process of making medicine “work” by each set of actors relies upon particular ways of knowing and not knowing life, bringing some ontologies into being, letting others wither away. The shared ways of knowing life as a movement of opening at the edges of the RCT are proposed as paths of recognition between one and the other practice.
Keywords : life, clinical trials, indigenous medicine, molecules, Artemisia afra

2008

Sannah Patience Nkami Mativandlela Jacob Jacobus Marion Meyer Ahmed A. Hussein Peter J. Houghton Chris J. Hamilton Namrita Lall
Activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis by extract of South African medicinal plants
Phytotherapy Research Volume 22, Issue 6, 15 April 2008

Full text submitted to request

Abstract :

Seven ethnobotanically selected medicinal plants were screened for their antimycobacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of four plants namely Artemisia afra, Dodonea angustifolia, Drosera capensis and Galenia africana ranged from 0.781 to 6.25 mg/mL against Mycobacterium smegmatis. G. africana showed the best activity exhibiting an MIC of 0.78 mg/mL and a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 1.56 mg/mL. The MICs of ethanol extracts of D. angustifolia and G. africana against M. tuberculosis were found to be 5.0 and 1.2 mg/mL respectively. The mammalian cytotoxicity IC50 value of the most active antimycobacterial extract, from G. africana, was found to be 101.3 µg/mL against monkey kidney Vero cells. Since the ethanol G. africana displayed the best antimycobacterial activity, it was subjected to fractionation which led to the isolation of a flavone, 5,7,2′‐trihydroxyflavone. The MIC of this compound was found to be 0.031 mg/mL against M. smegmatis and 0.10 mg/mL against M. tuberculosis. This study gives some scientific basis to the traditional use of these plants for TB‐related symptoms.

2009

Siyabulela Ntutela , Pete Smith, Lungile Matika, James Mukinda, Hiram Arendse, Nasiema Allie, D. Mark Estes, Wilfred Mabusela, Peter Folb, Lafras Steyn, Quinton Johnson, William R. Folk, James Syce and Muazzam Jacob
Efficacy of Artemisia afra phytotherapy in experimental tuberculosis
Tuberculosis (Edinb). 2009 December ; 89(Suppl 1) : S33–S40.

On Knowing and Not Knowing “Life” in Molecular Biology and Xhosa Healing : Ontologies in the Preclinical Trial of a South African Indigenous Medicine (Muthi)

Abstract :

The current rate of deforestation in Africa constitutes a serious danger to the future of medicinal plants on this continent. Conservation of these medicinal plants in the field and the scientific documentation of our knowledge about them are therefore crucial. An ethnobotanical survey of plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis was carried out in selected areas of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. These areas were Hala, Ncera, Sheshegu, and Gquamashe, all within the Nkonkobe Municipality. One hundred informants were interviewed. The survey included the identification of scientific and vernacular names of the plants used for treatment of tuberculosis as well as the methods of preparation and administration, the part used, dosage, and duration of treatment. The survey revealed 30 plants belonging to 21 families which are commonly used by traditional healers for the treatment of tuberculosis and associated diseases. Of these plants Clausena anisata, Haemanthus albiflos, and Artemisia afra were the most cited. The leaves were the most common part used in the medicinal preparations. Our findings are discussed in relation to the importance of the documentation of medicinal plants.

2013

Megan C. Pruissen
Evaluation of plant extracts : Artemisia afra and Annona muricata for inhibitory activities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency virus
Submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Magister Scientiae in the Faculty of Science at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University
January 2013

Evaluation of plant extracts : Artemisia afra and Annona muricata for inhibitory activities against Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency virus

Abstract :

Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Human Immuno-Deficiency Virus (HIV) have a high prevalence in South Africa. The development and spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a serious problem which is exacerbated by tuberculosis coinfection in HIV patients. Traditional medicinal plants like Annona muricata and Artemisia afra are used for respiratory ailments and antiviral therapies respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate Annona muricata (ethanolic extract) and Artemisia afra (ethanolic and aqueous extracts) for inhibitory activities against M. tuberculosis and HIV. In vitro bioassays for anti-tuberculosis activity included : microplate alamar blue assay (MABA), flow cytometry and ρ-iodonitrotetrazolium chloride assays while anti-HIV activity was determined using an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase colorimetric ELISA kit and an HIV-1 integrase colorimetric immunoassay. Cytotoxicity of plant extracts were assessed by the MTT assay on Chang Liver and HepG2 cells. Potential synergistic effects were determined using the basis of Combination Index. Potential interactions of plant extracts with drug metabolic pathways were evaluated with the Glutathione-S-Transferase assay kit as well as the CYP3A4 assay kit. Annona muricata ethanolic extract exhibited anti-tuberculosis activity with MIC 125 µg/mL. MABA was shown to be the most sensitive and effective method for the detection of anti-tuberculosis activity. Artemisia afra aqueous extract showed HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibition exhibiting ˃85% inhibition at 1 mg/mL while the ethanolic extracts of Artemisia afr and Annona muricata showed inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity at ˃86.8% and ˃88.54% respectively at concentrations >0.5 - 4 mg/mL. The aqueous extract of Artemisia afr displayed inhibition of HIV-1 integrase ˃52.16% at 0.5 mg/mL increasing to 72.89% at 4 mg/ml of the extract. Annona muricata was cytotoxic at an IC50 of 30 µg/mL and 77 µg/mL on Chang Liver and HepG2 cells respectively, whilst Artemisia afr aqueous and ethanol extracts were not cytotoxic to both cell lines. The ethanolic extract of Annona muricata showed both antagonistic and synergistic properties at various IC values, when used in conjunction with rifampicin. Artemisia afr ethanolic extract interrupted GST activity while aqueous extracts of Artemisia afr and Annona muricata had a slight effect. All extracts interrupted CYP3A4 activity, however the ethanolic extracts of Annona muricata and Artemisia afr showed greater inhibition than the aqueous extract of Artemisia afr. These extracts should be investigated further as they could be an important source of compounds for treatment of M. tuberculosis and HIV respectively.

***

Sebua Silas Semenya and Alfred Maroyi
Medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis by Bapedi traditional healers in three districts of the Limpopo province, South Africa
African Journal of Traditional Complementary Alternative Medicine. (2013) 10(2):316-323

Medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis by Bapedi traditional healers in three districts of the Limpopo province, South Africa

Abstract

The present study was aimed at documenting medicinal plants used for the reatment of tuberculosis (TB) by the Bapedi traditional healers in three districts of the Limpopo Province, South Africa. Fifty two traditional healers from 17 municipalities covering Capricorn, Sekhukhune and Waterberg districts were interviewed between January and July 2011. Twenty one medicinal plant species belonging to 20 genera and 18 families were documented. The majority (61.9%) are indigenous and the rest are exotics, found near homes as weeds or cultivated in home gardens as ornamentals or food plants.
Hyacinthaceae, Moraceae and Rutaceae families were the most represented families in terms of species numbers (9.5% each). Herbs and trees (38% each) constituted the largest proportion of the growth forms of the medicinal plants used. Tuberculosis
remedies were mostly prepared from leaves (34%) followed by roots (21%). The therapeutic claims made on medicinal plants used to treat TB by the Bapedi traditional healers are well supported by literature, with 71.4% of the species having anti-microbial properties or have similar ethno medicinal uses in other countries. This study therefore, illustrates the importance of medicinal plants in the treatment and management of TB in the Limpopo Province, South Africa.

Keywords : Bapedi traditional healers, ethnobotanical survey, Limpopo Province, South Africa, tuberculosis.

2014

I. O. Lawal, D. S. Grierson, and A. J. Afolayan
Phytotherapeutic Information on Plants Used for the Treatment of Tuberculosis in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa
Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Volume 2014, Article ID 735423, 11 pages

Phytotherapeutic Information on Plants Used for the Treatment of Tuberculosis in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

Abstract :

The current rate of deforestation in Africa constitutes a serious danger to the future of medicinal plants on this continent. Conservation of these medicinal plants in the field and the scientific documentation of our knowledge about them are therefore crucial. An ethnobotanical survey of plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis was carried out in selected areas of the Eastern Cape, South Africa. These areas were Hala, Ncera, Sheshegu, and Gquamashe, all within the Nkonkobe Municipality. One hundred informants were interviewed. The survey included the identification of scientific and vernacular names of the plants used for treatment of tuberculosis as well as the methods of preparation and administration, the part used, dosage, and duration of treatment. The survey revealed 30 plants belonging to 21 families which are commonly used by traditional healers for the treatment of TB and associated diseases. Of these plants Clausena anisata, Haemanthus albiflos, and Artemisia afra were the most cited. The leaves were the most common part used in the medicinal preparations. Our findings are discussed in relation to the importance of the documentation of medicinal plants.

***

L. V. Buwa and A. J. Afolayan*
Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa
African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 8 (23), pp. 6683-6687, 1 December, 2009

Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa

Abstract :

Artemisia afra Jacq. Ex Willd., Carpobrotus edulis L. and Tulbaghia violacea Harv. were screened for activity against Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium aurum A+ strain using a two-fold microdilution bioassay. M. aurum is tuberculosis (TB) related strain that was used in this study. These plants were selected based on their use by South African traditional healers for the treatment of TB and symptoms of the disease. All three plants were extracted with water, ethanol and dichloromethane. The extracts of A. afra were found to be active against all the tested microorganisms. Only in the instance of A. afra and C. edulis did water extract show activity against M. aurum A+ strain. The ethanol extract of C. edulis showed very good activity against the Gram-positive bacteria only. Dichloromethane extracts of T. violacea were found to be highly active against all the microorganisms, except for K. pneumoniae.

Key words : Medicinal plants, tuberculosis, antibacterial activity, Mycobacterium aurum.

***

M van de Venter, M Pruissen, T Koekemoer, A Sowemimo, S Govender
In vitro anti-HIV and -TB activities of Annona muricata and Artemisia afra extracts
Planta Medica 2014 ; 80 - P1L29

Full text non available

Congress Abstract

Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Human Immuno-Deficiency Virus (HIV) have a high prevalence in Africa. The development and spread of drug resistant tuberculosis is a serious problem which is exacerbated by tuberculosis (TB) co-infection in HIV patients. Traditional medicinal plants like Annona muricata and Artemisia afra are used for respiratory ailments and antiviral therapies respectively. The aim of this study was to evaluate Annona muricata (ethanol extract) and Artemisia afra (ethanol and aqueous extracts) for inhibitory activities against M. tuberculosis and HIV. In vitro bioassays for anti-TB activity included : microplate alamar blue assay (MABA) and ρ-iodonitrotetrazolium chloride assays while anti-HIV activity was determined using an HIV-1 reverse transcriptase colorimetric ELISA kit and HIV-1 integrase colorimetric immunoassay. Cytotoxicity of plant extracts were assessed by the MTT assay on Chang Liver and HepG2 cells. Interactions of plant extracts with drug metabolic pathways were evaluated with the Glutathione-S-Transferase and CYP3A4 assay kits. A. muricata ethanol extract exhibited anti-TB activity with MIC 125 µg/mL. Artemisia afra aqueous extract showed weak HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibition while the ethanol extracts of A. afra and A. muricata showed inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity with IC50 s < 100 µg/ml. A. muricata was cytotoxic at IC50 of 30 µg/mL and 77 µg/mL on Chang Liver and HepG2 cells respectively, whilst A. afra aqueous and ethanol extracts were not cytotoxic to both cell lines. A. afra ethanol extract caused a 76.7% inhibition of GST activity at 62 µg/ml, while A. afra (aq) and A. muricata had a slight effect. All extracts inhibited CYP3A4 activity, however the ethanol extracts of A. muricata and A. afra showed greater inhibition than the aqueous A. afra extract (IC50 s 4.5, 25 and 200 µg/ml, respectively). These extracts could be an important source of compounds for treatment of M. tuberculosis and HIV respectively.

Keywords : HIV, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Annona muricata, Artemisia afra, herb-drug interaction

2015

Pierre Lutgen
Geophagia, Artemisia afra and Tuberculosis
malariaworld.org April 16. 2015

Online article

***

Pierre Lutgen
Pulmonary administration of Artemisia afra against tuberculosis
malariaworld.org April 29. 2016

Online article

2017

Plants in our combating strategies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis : progress made and obstacles met
Pharmaceutical Biology, 2017, Vol. 55, n° 1, 1536–1544

Plants in our combating strategies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis : progress made and obstacles met

Abstract :

Context : Traditionally used plants for treating chest-related problems/tuberculosis (TB) have not been evaluated in detail and hence a thorough study is needed in this regard. This knowledge may find application in developing new anti-TB drugs.

Objective : This article elaborates on studying the activity of medicinal plants against different forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) using different model strains, in vitro and ex vivo assays for studying the tuberculocidal activity and discusses the results from different studies on the activity against different forms of Mtb and human immunodeficiency virus-tuberculosis (HIV-TB) co-infection.

Methods : Scientific databases such as PubMed, Elsevier, Scopus, Google scholar, were used to retrieve the information from 86 research articles (published from 1994 to 2016) related to the topic of this review.

Results : Twenty-three plant species have been reported to possess active molecules against multi-drug resistant (MDR) isolates of Mtb. Seven plants were found to be active against intracellular Mtb and six against dormant bacilli. Seven plants were synergistically effective when combined with anti-TB drugs. Six studies suggest that the beneficial effects of plant extracts are due to their wide array of immuno-modulatory effects manifested by the higher expression of cytokines. Some studies have also shown the dual activity (anti-HIV and anti-TB) of plants.

Conclusion : We emphasize on identifying plants based on traditional uses and testing their extracts/phytomolecules against MDR strains, intracellular Mtb as well as against dormant Mtb. This will help in future to shorten the current therapeutic regimens for TB and also for treating HIV-TB co-infection.

Keywords : MDR, plant extracts, anti-TB phytomolecules, plant-based drugs

Mis en ligne par La vie re-belle
 3/04/2020
 https://lavierebelle.org/artemisia-afra-etudes-des

 Documents

 On Knowing and Not Knowing “Life” in Molecular Biology and Xhosa Healing : Ontologies in the Preclinical Trial of a South African Indigenous Medicine (Muthi)
PDF 
 Anthropology of Consciousness
 Efficacy of Artemisia afra phytotherapy in experimental tuberculosis
PDF 
 Tuberculosis (Edinb)
 Phytotherapeutic Information on Plants Used for the Treatment of Tuberculosis in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa
PDF 
 Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
 Antimicrobial activity of some medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa
PDF 
 South Africa African Journal of Biotechnology

Études in vivo

Études in vivo de la plante Artemisia afra

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